What’s the harm of taking Bible verses out of context?

There is a problem in the church today that has been weighing very heavily on my heart lately. The problem is a widespread lack of Biblical literacy.

One of the ways this manifests is through the misuse of Bible verses in art/ home decor/online memes etc.

You only need to walk into a Christian book shop (or look in their online store) to see examples of this.

Some “out of context verses” are blatantly obvious, like Psalm 46:5 on this shirt (and if you search “God is within her shirt”, you will find many more!):

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In this passage, the “her” that God is within refers to the Holy City, not a woman. So it is horribly inaccurate (bordering on blasphemous) to slap this verse on a shirt and claim that it applies to the person wearing it.

But other verses that are commonly taken out of context are less obviously wrong, like Jeremiah 29:11 – For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.

This is another verse commonly found all over coffee mugs, posters, colouring sheets, t-shirts, etc.

It is a promise claimed by many present-day Christians as applying to themselves.

But if we zoom out a little, we can see that the context of Jeremiah 29 is a letter to the Exiles (I would encourage you to go read the whole chapter – it’s great!):

1 This is the text of the letter that the prophet Jeremiah sent from Jerusalem to the surviving elders among the exiles and to the priests, the prophets and all the other people Nebuchadnezzar had carried into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon.

10 This is what the Lord says: “When seventy years are completed for Babylon, I will come to you and fulfill my good promise to bring you back to this place. 11 For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. 12 Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. 13 You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart. 14 I will be found by you,” declares the Lord, “and will bring you back from captivity. I will gather you from all the nations and places where I have banished you,” declares the Lord, “and will bring you back to the place from which I carried you into exile.”

So, we can see from reading the context that the “plans” God has in verse 11 are plans specifically for the exiled Jews, to bring them back to the land of Israel to be in relationship with Him again.

And while we understand from the New Testament that those who trust in Jesus are part of the true Israel, not everything that was written to the physical Israel can be directly applied to the spiritual Israel.

But why does this verse appear over all manner of floral and sparkly items in the Christian book shop? Isn’t it because we find comfort in the idea that God has a plan for us? That He has a good plan for us?

And even if it’s not entirely accurate to apply this verse to present day Christians, isn’t this idea basically true – that God has a plan for us, to prosper and not harm us? And if it’s basically true and it encourages us in our faith, then why not memorize it and apply it to ourselves? What’s the harm?

That’s the big question I want to tackle in this blog post…

What is the harm in taking Bible verses out of context, in ways that are more-or-less true, for the benefit of our personal faith (or even to encourage a friend)?

I think this kind of (benevolent) misuse of Bible verses is indeed harmful, and there are four reasons why.

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Hilarious example of a Bible verse out of context that I found in a local shop. Anyone want this canvas on their living room wall?

 

1. It maligns the word of God, by showing that we don’t take it seriously.

The Bible is not another self-help book that we are free to read and interpret as we wish. It is God’s authoritative word to all people. But when we use Bible verses out of context – whether by ignorance or carelessness – we are sending the message to other people that we don’t really believe that.

When we take a verse of Scripture, put it up somewhere on display because of the meaning we get from it, and then put that little verse reference on the end, we are giving it the stamp of God’s authority. Putting that Bible reference on the end is saying, “this statement comes from God” – that’s why we do it, because these Scripture quotes have the authority of God behind them. Otherwise, we could easily just write inspirational quotes for ourselves and stick those around our house.

So if we are using Bible verses because they come with the authority of God, then it is even more important that we don’t misuse or misrepresent what He actually meant.

 

 

2. We make the Bible about us, and what we can get out of it.

It’s not about us, it’s about God.

True, we learn things about ourselves (or have them revealed to us) as we read the Bible. But it is primarily a book about God. And when we pull verses out of context, it is usually because we feel it “speaks to us” or has a “special meaning” for our personal circumstance.

Here’s the truth – not everything in the Bible is about us!

Are there things we can learn from the whole Bible? Sure! Are there things that apply to us? Yes!

But the Bible was written to us, not about us.

The Bible is all about God and His plan through Jesus to save His people.

If we pull out verses for our personal encouragement (again, that are not blatantly false or evil), we are learning to approach the Bible to see what we can get out of it, or what it says about us. This is not the main reason we should read the Bible.

If you read the Bible mainly to see what it says to you, then what happens when you get to a time where reading the Bible just feels “dry”? When you’re trying to plough through the laws of Leviticus, and finding it really hard because there’s not a lot about you in there? (And even less that you can pull out and write on a mug…)

Well, you might be tempted to stop reading. You might feel like God is distant. You might give up on that book and go back to something more… relevant.

Friends, a me-centred faith is a weak faith. Don’t fall into the trap of letting your Bible reading and application be focused on yourself.

 

 

3. It is not true or accurate.

You can find many verses in the Bible that you can pull out to make you feel better (and also many that will terrify you). You could easily use it like this – as a “spiritual” reference book that you flick through and pull out the bits you need.

You could use it like that, but it wouldn’t be true or accurate.

Going back to my example above, I can pull out Jeremiah 29:11 – “For I know the plans I have for you, declares the LORD, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and a future…” – and say that it is about me. That God would never harm me and that he has plans to prosper me.

I could “claim” all that for myself. But it isn’t true. It isn’t what that passage is saying or why it is there. By claiming the nice-sounding falsehood for myself, I actually miss out on the more glorious truth in Jeremiah 29.

That an unfaithful, rebellious people are undeservedly pursued and loved by their faithful God. That God had not forgotten them and that he heard their cries.

That God is sovereign over everything.

And ultimately, Jeremiah 29 points us to Jesus – the one perfect Saviour and Rescuer of a stubborn, rebellious people.

All that is waaaayyy more amazing than just “God has a plan for me”.

Don’t settle for sweet-sounding – but false – platitudes that you pluck from your Bible. Because the truth of the Bible is far more wonderful.

 

 

4. It leads to more dangerous Scripture-twisting.

On the face of it, pulling a passage out of context to say that God has good plans for us doesn’t seem as bad as pulling a passage out of context to say that Jesus is not God (like my new JW friends did).

But I actually think the former leads to the latter.

If we begin to allow ourselves to treat the Bible as a book that is about us and which we can interpret as we wish, it acclimatises us to the practice of picking out verses that support our argument (eisegesis), rather than examining the text to understand it’s real meaning (exegesis).

It’s far better to commit ourselves to good Bible study habits from the beginning, rather than practice habits that will not yield good fruit in the long run.

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It’s a slippery slope… hahaha.

 

Friends, I don’t make these points to hold myself up as someone who studies and uses the Bible perfectly. Misuse of Bible verses is something I’ve been convicted of myself, and I wanted to share my thinking on this for the benefit of all you sisters in Christ. So please – if you see me taking a verse/passage out of context, call me out on it!

And I also feel the need to add… I love beauty. I love art. I love pretty mugs and colouring-in and t-shirts with Bible verses on them. That’s not what I have a problem with. And if you walk into my house, you will see many of these things. The issue is in which verses are being used, how they are being represented and if that use and representation is true and accurate.

Let’s do better together, as we study and apply God’s good word to us.

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Why Should we Expect Obedience?

Can I be honest with you about something?

Sometimes I yell at my kids.

It is an ongoing struggle in my heart – I know it is sin, and yet I keep doing it. *

It’s the kind of struggle that makes me think “I’m failing as a mother.”

The kind of struggle that makes me think, “How can I expect that they obey me, when I mess up all the time? How can I tell them that yelling is not a kind way to speak, when I yell at them sometimes?”

It makes me feel like such a hypocrite.

What authority do I have to instruct and train and discipline these little ones?

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Expecting obedience from our children can be a controversial topic these days.

My generation of parents tends to shun authority for the sake of authority. Perhaps we have bad memories of being told “because I’m the parent, that’s why” when we were kids. Perhaps we felt locked down and constrained by (seemingly arbitrary) rules. Perhaps we felt shamed into behaving a certain way.

So we can be left asking, “Why should I expect my child to obey me?”

But as Christian mothers, we need to base our parenting on God’s word, the Bible.

And the Bible is quite clear that children should obey their parents (Ephesians 6:1, Colossians 3:20 and 1 Timothy 3:4).

But why?

Is it because grown ups are better behaved than kids? Is it because we “did our time” being kids, and now it’s our turn to be the boss?

No, the authority given to Christian parents – like everything given to us as Christians – is a gift of God’s grace. It is not something we earn. It is not something we deserve. It is not based on our own merit or goodness.

This is so encouraging to me as a Mum who struggles with sin, even the horrible, ugly sin of yelling.

I don’t need to listen to the voices of doubt or the accusations that I am failing as a mother, that I don’t deserve to have these children under my care.

I am a sinner deeply in need of God’s grace, just like they are.

I don’t have authority over them because I deserve it or I’m better than they are. I might be further along the road than them in my walk with Jesus, but we are on the same road.

And when I sin, I don’t need to pretend I’m always right or be bull-headed with them. I can be free to humbly come before them and say “I’m sorry for yelling at you – that was wrong. Please forgive me.”

Because my authority does not come from myself. It doesn’t come from how good I am personally.

It is a gift from God for their protection, their training and ultimately to point to a good and perfect Father in heaven (in contrast with their imperfect earthly parents).

And that’s how we can expect and train our children to obey. We don’t appeal to “because I’m the parent, that’s why”. We teach them, “because God gave you parents to love you and train you, and obeying us is what God wants you to do.”

I know, it will sound weird and awkward at first. We live in a very anti-authority society. As we train our children to love and submit to God’s good authority, we often need to re-train our own brains as well.

I would just encourage you, whatever parenting articles you read or ideas you mull over, always take them back to the Bible and see whether they match or contradict what the Bible says.

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* On the issue of yelling, I’ve seen many articles across Facebook and various blogs about how parents can stop yelling using a number of techniques like reducing stress, connecting with your kids more or finding different discipline techniques so you don’t use yelling as your fall-back option.

Most of these suggestions are good and helpful things – I definitely notice that I yell less when I take the time to be more connected, less rushed and more proactive on the discipline front. But there is a problematic assumption here – that yelling is merely something caused by outward circumstances, and if we just change those circumstances, then we won’t need to yell any more.

But the Bible teaches us that our mouths can only bring out what is already in our hearts – no one and no circumstance can “make” us yell or get angry. We yell and get angry because there is sin in our hearts. And that can’t be changed by following ten easy steps or doing yoga every morning.

Sure, we might seem to stop yelling as much and on the surface, it looks like those techniques work. But we have failed to deal with the deeper issue of a sinful heart. Jesus is the only one who can change hearts. The Bible prophecies about life in Jesus in the Old Testament with this amazing promise:

 I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. (Ezekiel 36:26)

So let’s not settle for surface solutions to heart-deep issues!

Here is an article from Jess Connell about tackling the sin of yelling at the heart level, if this is a struggle for you also. I’ve personally found this article really helpful: http://jessconnell.com/make-no-provision-for-your-yelling/

Happily Married?

You know that clichéd movie scene (that I can’t find any examples of on Youtube…), where there is a woman sitting at a bar. A man comes over and offers to buy her a drink.

She smiles and answers, “I’m married.”

He asks, “Happily?”

The implication being, that if someone is happily married, then you shouldn’t bother hitting on them. But if someone is unhappily married, then they are ripe for flirting and pursuing a sexual relationship with.

And this kind of scene (with it’s implication) has always irked me. Because being unhappily married shouldn’t give someone a free pass to hit on you, and it shouldn’t be used as a justification to cheat.

I have no idea if this kind of thing happens in real life – movie dialogue tends to be somewhat stilted and is there for it’s ability to further the plot, not for it’s accuracy.

But I have certainly heard of adulterous relationships starting because one spouse shares with a “friend” that things are difficult in their marriage. This then builds emotional intimacy and paves the way for sexual intimacy with someone who is not their spouse.

The Bible also tells us that spouses who are not sexually satisfied will be more tempted to go outside the marriage – “Do not deprive each other except perhaps by mutual consent and for a time, so that you may devote yourselves to prayer. Then come together again so that Satan will not tempt you because of your lack of self-control” (1 Corinthians 7:5). And yet, this is by no means providing a justification for people to commit adultery if their needs are not met.

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What is important is not that we are happily married, but that we are faithfully married. That we keep our vows even through seasons of unhappiness and dissatisfaction.

And on the flip side of that, if you feel unhappy in your marriage – or if you start to notice yourself being more receptive to attention from people outside the marriage – DO something about it!

Sure, one person cannot be responsible for the whole marriage on their own, but one person committed to doing good for their husband or wife (no matter what) can certainly make a big difference!

As the saying goes, the grass is greener where you water it.

Picking My Attitude Up Off The Floor

Picture this:

A cold, miserable Monday. It’s raining, possibly sleeting.

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I’m not too old to jump in puddles, right?

The kids are bouncing around after school, climbing all over each other as a substitute for the swing set that is too wet to climb on.

If the toddler isn’t whining, he is destroying something. (Seriously, if there were toddler Olympics and one of the sports was “who can cause the most destruction in 1 minute”, he would win it!)

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Whole jar of rosemary. All. Over. The. Floor.

I tried three times to start washing dishes, but I didn’t even get to the point of running the water.

What did I do next?

You have one life line left. Would you like to phone a friend?

Yeah, I called my husband, in a kind of panicked state (but without the energy) to ask when he would be home.

Sometimes I get to this point where I just don’t even bother trying any more. I feel defeated.

And at that point, I really just want the 2D version of my husband (the one who didn’t just spend a whole day at work, doesn’t have his own feelings and needs, and only exists when he is around me…) to walk in the door and rescue me. Just walk in the door, (metaphorically) whip the kids into line and magically make the mess disappear.

And I kind of just sit down, pop the TV on for the kids and scroll through the internet until he comes home and works the Daddy magic.

Today I started to do that – I had already plonked my butt on a kitchen stool – but then I thought to myself, I am a grown woman. I might not be able to turn the whole day around, but I certainly don’t need to sit on my butt doing nothing, waiting to be rescued…

So I got up off the stool and started picking things up. Yes, the house is still a mess. No, the dishes still didn’t get done. But I did something.

And as I walked around the house clearing up the small messes, putting the bin liners back in and wiping down the benches, I cleared away the mess in my heart.

I wiped away all the why is this house so messy and the why can’t the kids just play nicely for five minutes.

I cleaned up the stinking piles of no one appreciates what I do.

I scrubbed at the mysteriously sticky my husband has it so much easier than me.

And I had to get out the bleach to deal with the toxic heap of God, I deserve better than this.

 

And when my 3D husband walked in the front door, and our eyes locked across the work-in-progress living room, I smiled at him. (And he smiled back at me *blush*)

I’m not talking about plastering on some fake smile.

No, that smile was the real smile of a real woman who did the real heart-work of turning to God instead of wallowing in self-pity and despair. It was not the desperate, grasping glare of a damsel in distress, trapped in a tower of dirty dishes waiting for her 2D knight in a business shirt to rescue her.

(Goodness knows, we’ve been there before! But that season has passed…)

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File under “F” for “Feline Dictator”

This is just one day, but honestly there are many days that end like this. The chaos of tired little bodies, and a whole day’s worth of mess and a Mummy who is counting down until bedtime…
And although my growth as a Christian woman has not been linear, it’s certainly evident to me that God is working in my heart, making me quicker to renounce complaining and embrace rejoicing.

Sometimes we look at the Proverbs 31 woman and think about how unattainable and impossible that standard is. But the thing is, she didn’t get there overnight!

I hope that in 20 years’ time, when I face different but equally stressful and exhausting situations, I will be able to look back on days like this as God’s training ground, where he has been working with me to make me a better woman.

 

Scattered thoughts…

I’ve almost written a few blog posts recently, but have held off as my thoughts are not quite fully formed yet. (I’ll get there, lol.)

So here is an offering of some bits and pieces that I’ve been thinking about lately.

 

Simple Pleasures

In this season of life I have been enjoying the many simple pleasures throughout my day.

  • Playing with my kids and making them laugh heartily
  • The neighbour’s chicken that keeps getting into our yard.
  • Watching my daughter learn to read.
  • The warm sun that pierces through the cold winter air.
  • Waking up before sunrise and my children and just taking a minute to watch the light peaking over the hills.
  • My baby (toddler?) who has learnt how to cuddle.

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From Milk to Meat

When I had our third baby last year, I knew things would be crazy for a while. Not only was it hard to find time, but I also felt like my brain couldn’t quite cope with the in-depth Bible study I used to do on my own.
So, I made sure I was still listening to God in His word over that year, but it was mostly in the form of Bible verses stuck up around the house or specific passages memorised or a longer section read every once in a while.

I was sustaining myself on the “milk” version of God’s word – enough to keep me fed, but not forever.
Now, I have been enjoying getting back into the more “meaty” study of God’s word. Specifically, the book of Romans at the moment. There is just so much good stuff in there!

Reading Romans Like

I have printed out this bookmark from Women Living Well, which shows you which colours to highlight Bible verses according to their main theme. This has been really helpful for me, because it forces me to concentrate and really think about what the passage is saying.
I’m very much a pen and paper kind of girl – writing things down really helps me to take them in and absorb the concepts. I usually pull out my journal and do some kind of visual representation of what I’ve read.
Sometimes that looks like this:

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And other times it looks more like this:

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So I guess I would just like to offer a word of encouragement to my sisters in Christ – if you have been struggling to get into the Word or to really make time for in-depth study of the Bible, don’t neglect it any longer!

You can “not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God” (Matthew 4:4). Just like you take the time to feed yourself every day, don’t neglect feeding yourself spiritually.


Scared of the Dark

Our older two kids have been starting to say that they are afraid when it’s dark at night or they are scared that baddies are going to get them (they share a room).

I’m sure sometimes it’s just one tool in the toolbox of “ways to avoid bedtime”, but still, I think it’s important to listen to their heart and always use these opportunities to shepherd them towards Jesus.

So we’ve been working on memorising Psalm 27:1

The Lord is my light and my salvation – whom shall I fear?

The Lord is the stronghold of my life – of whom shall I be afraid?

Once we go over the verse a few times, we work through it’s meaning.

If you’re scared because it’s dark, remember that God is always with you and he will be your light.

What’s a stronghold? Well, it’s kind of like a big, tall tower that no baddies can get into. When you trust in God, he will keep you safe.

What does is mean that the Lord is your salvation? Well, the truly scary and dangerous thing in life is your own sin, because being a sinner means you deserve death. But the wonderful thing is that God sent Jesus to die on the cross and come back to life so that you can be saved from what you deserve. That’s why it’s great that the Lord is your salvation, because it means you don’t have to be afraid of anything!

 

I want our kids to know that no matter what is troubling them in life, God’s word is alive and relevant to them. They can turn to Him and find truth and clarity for whatever their situation.


 

So there you go – I’m over here enjoying the simple pleasures in life, carving up a big slab of Romans and teaching our kids how to apply the Bible to their lives.

What have you been up to?

Like a Child

Today we were driving to the shops, and my daughter said, “Oh no! Someone left their Old McDonald’s wrapper ON THE GROUND!”

“That’s not good, is it, honey? People should pick up their rubbish,” I said.

“I know!” she said immediately. “We could have a garbage hunt!”

And so – when the weather improves – we plan on having a garbage hunt. Walking around our neighbourhood with a garbage bag, picking up all the rubbish we find.

I don’t know if this is something they’ve done at school before, but I’m fairly certain her teacher has talked to her class about the environmental impacts of leaving your rubbish lying around. She has come home from school before talking to me about how rubbish that washes into the water ways can cause fish to choke and die.

And just the other day we were walking back to the car and she stopped to pick up someone’s empty juice popper “so we can put it in the bin at home”.

For her, it is so simple… Rubbish pollutes the world, so we should pick up rubbish and put it in the bin.

Belief = action.

We call this integrity, when a persons actions match their beliefs.

But I don’t think it’s so simple for adults.

We know that littering is bad for the environment, yet most of us would quite happily walk past someone else’s rubbish because we don’t want to touch it or be seen touching it or it’s not our fault.

Our actions don’t match our beliefs.


 

The other day, while I was having an internal ultrasound, I had the opportunity to explain the gospel to a stranger – the ultrasound technician (now, don’t tell me you find it uncomfortable to talk about your faith…).

He asked what the difference between Catholics and Protestants was, and I proceeded to explain that the main difference is that Protestants believe that the only way to be saved is by having faith in God, not your own good works.

This is the good news of the gospel – that salvation is a gift, from start to finish, and there is nothing we can do to contribute to that.

It’s very good news, but it does cause problems with our human nature.

Because some of us hear that and think, Great! I will just trust in Jesus and then get on with my life, doing whatever I please, because I am saved anyway!

This is why James needed to write in the Bible:

What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if someone claims to have faith but has no deeds? Can such faith save them? Suppose a brother or a sister is without clothes and daily food. If one of you says to them, “Go in peace; keep warm and well fed,” but does nothing about their physical needs, what good is it? In the same way, faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead.

Yes, faith in God is all we need to be saved. James is not arguing that our good deeds somehow contribute to our salvation, like an add-on to faith. Rather, he is saying that deeds are the evidence of faith.
We can’t say that we have real faith – a living faith – if we don’t act on it.

 

If we say we believe that Jesus is the Lord and the only way to God, but we don’t worship him, our faith is dead.

If we say we believe that only those who trust in Jesus will go to heaven and everyone else will go to hell, but we don’t tell people about Him, our faith is dead.

If we say we believe that living life God’s way is best, but we don’t obey him, our faith is dead.

Faith without action is nothing.

In fact, it’s worse than nothing – it’s hypocrisy.

 

Maybe we have something to learn from children here.

They have no gap between their beliefs and their actions.

Let’s have a real, live faith.

A child-like faith.

A faith that cannot help but act.

 

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When You Don’t Want to Change

 

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Every morning when I dropped my daughter to school, I saw this beautiful tree in the car park.

I was drawn to it’s bright red leaves. I loved the way it was still clinging to them despite all the other trees having dropped their leaves weeks ago.

I guess it was a picture of resilience to me – a lone tree clinging to beauty in the face of bitter frost and fog.

But the other morning I saw something different.

I saw defiance and rebellion. I saw one little tree recklessly holding onto “same” when it was time for “change”.

 

It made me reflect on life’s seasons, and how sometimes I can stubbornly cling to one season, even long after the fog and frost has arrived. Refusing to let go of the warmth and colour of autumn, even when the time for winter is here.

You see, I really hate change.

I’m like, okay, so this is the season we’re in? Great, let me make up a schedule. Let me find what works. Let me finesse our routine.

See? I can totally do this. Everything is running smoothly. Life is just gre…

What? A new season already? But I just… *sigh*

 

So I really relate to that little tree with it’s brilliant red leaves. It’s just got the hang of autumn. It’s rocking autumn. And it just isn’t ready to deal with a new season yet.

The Bible says that just like the seasons in nature, there are seasons in life.

Ecclesiastes 3 puts it like this:

There is a time for everything,
    and a season for every activity under the heavens:

    a time to be born and a time to die,
    a time to plant and a time to uproot,
    a time to kill and a time to heal,
    a time to tear down and a time to build,
    a time to weep and a time to laugh,
    a time to mourn and a time to dance,
    a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them,
    a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,
    a time to search and a time to give up,
    a time to keep and a time to throw away,
    a time to tear and a time to mend,
    a time to be silent and a time to speak,
    a time to love and a time to hate,
    a time for war and a time for peace.

And just as there is a season for everything, it is God who directs the seasons and determines when it is time for each activity.

The passage goes on to say that “He has made everything beautiful in its time.

When I cling to the last season, unwilling to let it go and move into the new season of life, what I’m saying is that I believe my fears more than I believe God.

I’m saying that my own worries about what the new season might bring are bigger than the God who guides the seasons.

Which is ridiculous!

I think of Jesus walking on the water, calling Peter to walk out of the boat, across the water to Him. All Peter could see was his fears (and to be honest, logic!). Logic and experience says that if you step on water, you will fall in.

But Peter forgot Who was calling him.

The very One who made the water with all of it’s natural laws! He had no reason to fear, because Jesus was the one who made and controlled the whole realm of nature.

When God calls me into a new season – when He says “it’s time for something else” – there’s no reason for me to fear because He holds the seasons in His hands.

He is the just as much the Lord of autumn’s brilliant hues as he is the Lord of winter’s frost and fog.

And whatever season my life is in, I can trust Him.